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Storm will trigger more flooding rain, severe weather across the South

May 2 (UPI) — Following flooding rainfall across much of Texas late last week and into the first part of the weekend, a storm will continue to crawl northeastward, bringing drenching rain and a severe thunderstorm threat across the southern United States to ring in the first week of May.

Flooding downpours have ceased across much of Texas with locations north of Houston and into the northern suburbs of Corpus Christi, Texas, picking up over 8 inches since Thursday morning.

Before the abundant rainfall across much of Texas, moderate to exceptional drought conditions were prevalent across the state, according to the United States Drought Monitor.

Over the course of April, cities like Corpus Christi had only picked up about 87% of their average rainfall. As flooding rainfall drenched much of the city on Saturday, the city is now 154% above their average rainfall. This is also true in Houston were they only had 77% of their average rainfall in April, but including Saturday, the city is now 111% over average.

As the slow-moving storm crawls northeastward, heavy rain will continue to expand, along with the threat for severe weather into the central Gulf Coast states through Sunday evening.

Heavy rain is anticipated to be centered over Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi and into southern Missouri into Sunday evening. Downpours could bring 1-3 inches of rainfall to these states that have had above-normal rainfall since April 1.

For example, Jackson, Miss., has reported nearly 8 inches of rainfall since April 1. Normally during the month of April, the city receives 5 inches. Likewise in Shreveport, La., picked up over 5 inches, while normally they report 4 inches throughout April.

Farther south, New Orleans has reported over a foot of rainfall over the month of April, while normally they report just shy of 5 inches. The rainfall amount New Orleans has reported is 271% above normal.

“Even though the rain may not be as intense in this zone when compared to what southeastern Texas experienced on Saturday, much of the Gulf Coast states are not in drought and may only be able to handle a moderate amount of rain with flood-related problems,” AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Dan Pydynowski said.

Flash flooding can also be dangerous for motorists. Experts urge motorists to never attempt to drive across a flooded roadway. The road surface may have been washed away or the water may be much deeper than it appears and could cause your vehicle to stall and/or be swept away.

Severe weather will also be imminent as the storm swings northeastward and moisture surges from the Gulf of Mexico across Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas through Sunday evening. Thunderstorms can bring hail, damaging wind gusts, with an AccuWeather Local StormMax™ of 70 mph, and even an isolated tornado.

Severe weather will also be imminent as the storm swings northeastward and moisture surges from the Gulf of Mexico across Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas through Sunday evening. Thunderstorms can bring hail, damaging wind gusts, with an AccuWeather Local StormMax™ of 70 mph, and even an isolated tornado.

Along with warm conditions, a series of storms will be tracking across the nation starting Monday, bringing rounds of wet weather to the East and another round of flooding rainfall and severe weather to the southern Plains and the Gulf Coast states through Tuesday.

One of these storms will swirl over the Great Lakes region Monday; meanwhile, another storm ejects out of the Rockies and into the southern Plains.

By late Monday into Monday night, severe weather is expected to set up from eastern Oklahoma into southern Missouri and extending into the lower Ohio River Valley as warm, moist air surges north from the Gulf of Mexico. These severe thunderstorms are expected to bring large hail, intense lightning, flash flooding and damaging wind gusts, with an AccuWeather Local StormMax™ of 80 mph.

Conditions could be just right in some locations late Monday through Monday night in the central Plains, making it possible for an isolated tornado or two.

Little Rock, Ark.; St. Louis; and Louisville, Ky., are anticipated to be in the path of severe weather.

The unsettled weather pattern will persist into Tuesday across much of the eastern U.S., with the risk of severe weather expected to shift eastward with the primary threat for damaging thunderstorms extending from the Gulf Coast to the central Appalachians.

“A surge of very humid air expanding northward through the Gulf states will collide with a storm moving up along a front from east Texas to the Ohio Valley and the result will be an outbreak of thunderstorms that will likely linger well into Tuesday night'” AccuWeather Senior Meteorologists Brett Anderson explained.

Storms may turn severe, especially during the afternoon and evening hours with hail, flooding downpours and damaging, straight-line wind gusts with an AccuWeather Local StormMax™ of 75 mph.

“There will also be pockets of flash flooding, especially in low-lying and poor drainage areas, but fortunately the storms will be moving along at a decent clip, which will limit the duration of intense rainfall for most areas,” Anderson continued.

Wet weather could continue along the Gulf Coast as the middle of the week comes around. A cold front extending from a storm moving through the Northeast could keep showers and thunderstorms around in Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. The flood threat will continue across the region, especially where heavy downpours set up.

Dry conditions may return to the South at the end of the week as high pressure is expected to move into the region, lowering humidity levels and dropping daytime high temperatures.

Source: Storm will trigger more flooding rain, severe weather across the South

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